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Curling world optimistically looks ahead to next season despite numerous challenges caused by pandemic

Despite the pandemic is gradually getting more and more predictable, curling organizers still remain optimistic to make preparations for the next seasons.

Before the whole world has been affected by the dangerous Covid-19, the last great Canadian sporting hurrah was one of the strongest editions of the Tim Hortons Brier.

Curling fans would quickly pack Kingston’s Leon’s Centre to enjoy games and then crowd largely in the “The Patch” party tent across the road afterward. Therefore, the festivities often last long until midnight.

It’s one of many special traditions of the Roaring Game which might become inexistent or at least undergo changes after the frozen period of curling world.

Curlers will not allow executing their pre-game handshakes and empty stands will become a possible fact happening at top events. International team participation could be something premium at Canadian tour stops.

However, these are all predictions as during this period, nothing about the incoming curling tournaments and plays is confirmed to be ensured.

Bonspiel organizer Gerry Geurts, who operates the CurlingZone website that manages world rankings and team point systems, said that the uncertainty about the next curling season definitely provokes such a significant challenge.

“It’s going to be a hit for the [curling] clubs and the events,” Geurts revealed his opinion during an interview taking place in London, Ont. “However the teams have to have the expectation that they’re going to take a bit of a hit at the same time too.”

The current off-season essentially has been activated in mid-March after the cancellation of the women’s world championship. Normally play would be executed again in late summer, however, autumn curling plays will still remain a puzzle to most people at the moment.

COVID-19 developments are forcing the sports world to take a cautious approach to the potential return of competition.

Team sponsorship difficulties

Curling has some certain challenges to overcome when it’s set to come back. Sponsorship concerns, travel restrictions, and event feasibility are some top concerns that the whole curling world has to deal with

“Some of those small- and medium-sized businesses that support local teams are going to have a harder time doing it,” reigning Brier champ Brad Gushue said.