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Curling at Olympics

Russian Curling Athlete’s Scandal at Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics

Russian curling athlete, Alexander Krushelnitsky, admitted to using meldonium when participating in the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics. This is a banned substance in sports competitions.

Russian media on February 21, 2018, simultaneously reported that the curling athlete, Alexander Krushelnitsky, of the country admitted to using meldonium. At the same time, he voluntarily returned the Bronze Medal that he and his wife, Anastasia Bryzgalova, won a few days ago in the curling couple.

The media quoted Russian curling Federation spokeswoman Valentina Parinova as saying that, along with the confession, the athlete Krushelnitsky vowed not to appear in the expected hearing of the Sports Arbitration Court (CAS). took place on February 22, thinking that his presence right now was meaningless.

Krushelnitsky’s acknowledgment was a blow to Russia’s efforts to improve the image of sports after the doping scandal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. December 2017 for the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to consider easing the ban on athletes.

Krushelnitsky is one of 168 Russian athletes authorized by the IOC to compete in the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games as a neutral athlete after proving that he is clean before doping. Krushelnitsky’s scandal also made the opportunity of the Russian flag to appear at the closing ceremony of the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang 2018 becoming more fragile than ever.

Earlier, the IOC left open the possibility that Olympic athletes from Russia would receive the flag on the closing night if they respect and absolutely adhere to the rules set by the organization.

There have been three cases of doping use during the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, including Japanese speed skater Kei Saito, Slovenian ice hockey player Ziga Jeglic and Alexander Krushelnitsky.

WADA stated that it has conducted 17,000 tests since April 2017 and 2,500 urine and blood samples will be tested during the 17-day competition of the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games. WADA President Craig Reedie expressed hope this will create fair and honest competition environment in accordance with the Olympic spirit. He emphasized that all of WADA’s anti-doping efforts are aimed at providing a true playground for the athletes.