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GAIN MORE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT CURLING – HOW WAS IT FIRSTLY PLAYED AND DEVELOPED?

Curling, an interesting sports which is also called as the “Roarin’ Game”, as the roaring was inspired by the sound of the granite stone travelling acrossing the ice. The exact origin of the official name – “curling” has remained unknown to its fans. It is only known to be the world’s oldest team sports in the world.

However, it is discovered that there have been a painting which portrayed an activity which bears a striking resemblance to curling, being played on frozen ponds. The very first written document which recorded the process of playing curling was firstly seen in Latin, in 1940, which portrayed John McQuhin who is a notary living in Paisley, Scotland. In his protocol book, he recorded himself involving in a challenge between John Sclater, a monk in Paisley Abbey and Gavin Hamilton, a representative of the Abbot. This report showed the indication that Sclater was throwing a stone across the ice ground three times in total.
The most surprising factor is that such an interesting pastime like throwing stones across the ice ground, often taking place throughout the harsh condition of winter in Northern Europe like that can turn out to be such a renowned and well-recognized sports like nowadays. At this present, curling has been played in different professional worldwide tournaments and caught the attention of a large amount of fans.
At the very stage of curling, it was played on frozen lochs, ponds or lakes. When the weather condition turns out to be suitable and great for players, it is played pleasingly outside in some nations and regions. However, the large majority of curling competitions and tournaments take place in the indoor rinks for the safety of the play, where the condition and temperature of the ice is set beforehand and carefully under control.
The very first curling clubs being recognized were in Scotland during the period of the 19th century. It was then widely spread to other nations which feature cold climates with ice such as Canada, United States, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway and New Zealand.