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Curling at Olympics

Longtime event director Hansen suggests new ways to hold the next curling season

Due to the widespread of Covid-19, there are a lot of curling competition being cancelled and the rest of all tournament within the 2020-2021season will have to undergo alternative changes to adapt to this new situation. These are having to face the most challenging situation as they would make a return soon in a few months ahead.

Arenas will soon be full of spectators and players again as the sports world will soon be kicked off, and curling, none of an exception, will have to follow some certain rules. The powerbrokers of the sports world will continue their work of exploring numerous possibilities for competitions and tournaments, however, with the uncertainty about potential restrictions about the crowd to prevent the outbreak of the pandemic.

The sight of thousands of curling fans gathering in a bonspiel for attending the match would likely disappear in at least a few upcoming weeks. Public events if taking place, have to be held behind the closed door, which seems to be quite boring.

Warren Hansen who is a Curling Canada Hall of Famer, spending over the past 20 years on running event operations for the national federation, says new ways is in need to be executed for at least get top curling competitions on television.

“Find a perfect arena which is close to the airport, make a deal with some hotels then try to stream the things online for at least your television audience,” Hansen said.

Considering some important factors such as air travel skittishness or restrictions hampering transport, Hansen gives opinions of holding events in major cities such as Winnipeg or Calgary, which will be perfect choices.

Holding competitions on these revenues, Hansen shared that the majority of the top curlers could be in the better mode and determination to take part in the competition.

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Curling at Olympics

TAKE A CRASH COURSE ABOUT A BRAND NEW SPORTS IN THE WINTER OLYMPICS – CURLING

Before the 2018 Winter Olympics, there might only be skiing or figure-skating which caught all spectators and Olympics fans attention. However, after the 2018 Winter Olympics taking place on Feb 8th, it was curling that started to make a huge impression on fans. Many people paid accomplishment to this brand new sports which totally enchanted and took their hearts away. However, to be honest, just a few curling fans actually know the rules as well as the origin of this sport. Below are some of the certain rules which curling fans should better get a clue to have a more thorough insight into their favorite sports.

What is Curling?

Curling is a sport that requires the whole team of about 4 players involved. It is played on an ice field in the shape of a rectangular with the participation of 2 teams, each team has 4 players. Curling is played with two types of brooms, either a brush “push-broom” in another name or a corn/straw/Canadian broom. These brooms are used to push large, dense granite rocks that weigh 44 pounds per broom. They are called curling rocks or curling stones. They are made of rare granite which is extracted from the Scottish island of Ailsa Craig. Curling gets another name as “the roaring game” because the stones while moving across the ice create such a loud rumbling sound. Players often play curling on a 42.07-meter-long and 4.28-meter-wide rink with a target or house (one is blue and the other is red with the circle shape on the ice). The surface of the ring is made from artificially created ice being sprinkled with water droplets meant to freeze into small drops on the surface. This is called “pebbled ice”. Pebbled ice is used to aid in the stone’s grip with the viewing to make curling more consistent.

Curlers’ mission is to draw their stones as close to the center of these circles as possible. The more scores they can make, the closer they will be to the victory. Curlers need to use sweeping brooms to upgrade the speed of each stone. Some special curling shoes are utilized by players to grip the ice well.

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Curling at Olympics

Russian Curling Athlete’s Scandal at Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics

Russian curling athlete, Alexander Krushelnitsky, admitted to using meldonium when participating in the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics. This is a banned substance in sports competitions.

Russian media on February 21, 2018, simultaneously reported that the curling athlete, Alexander Krushelnitsky, of the country admitted to using meldonium. At the same time, he voluntarily returned the Bronze Medal that he and his wife, Anastasia Bryzgalova, won a few days ago in the curling couple.

The media quoted Russian curling Federation spokeswoman Valentina Parinova as saying that, along with the confession, the athlete Krushelnitsky vowed not to appear in the expected hearing of the Sports Arbitration Court (CAS). took place on February 22, thinking that his presence right now was meaningless.

Krushelnitsky’s acknowledgment was a blow to Russia’s efforts to improve the image of sports after the doping scandal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. December 2017 for the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to consider easing the ban on athletes.

Krushelnitsky is one of 168 Russian athletes authorized by the IOC to compete in the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games as a neutral athlete after proving that he is clean before doping. Krushelnitsky’s scandal also made the opportunity of the Russian flag to appear at the closing ceremony of the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang 2018 becoming more fragile than ever.

Earlier, the IOC left open the possibility that Olympic athletes from Russia would receive the flag on the closing night if they respect and absolutely adhere to the rules set by the organization.

There have been three cases of doping use during the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, including Japanese speed skater Kei Saito, Slovenian ice hockey player Ziga Jeglic and Alexander Krushelnitsky.

WADA stated that it has conducted 17,000 tests since April 2017 and 2,500 urine and blood samples will be tested during the 17-day competition of the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games. WADA President Craig Reedie expressed hope this will create fair and honest competition environment in accordance with the Olympic spirit. He emphasized that all of WADA’s anti-doping efforts are aimed at providing a true playground for the athletes.

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Curling at Olympics

Curling At Olympic Sochi 2014

An interesting and very old sport in Russia that will be competing at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics is Curling.

Curling was born long ago in 1541 in Scotland. And the first time the sport made its debut at the Olympic Games was in 1924 at Chamonix. But it was not until the 1998 Nagano Olympics that ice hockey was brought back to the official games at the Winter Olympics.

Curling seems simple and easy to play but not so. It is also a sport that combines both personal and teamwork, as well as the tactics needed to win, so it is also known as ice chess.

Curling competes within the area of a rectangular ice rink of 42.06m long and 4.75m wide, similar to a bowling alley. At the two ends of the ice rink, there are two circles of blue outer border, white edge, red inner band and white center with the radius of 1.83m, 1.22m, 0.61m and 0.15m respectively. Players of both teams will stand at the two ends of the field called “Hack” to throw weights towards the center of the “house” circle at the other end of the field.

The dumbbell used in Curling is called “Stone”, which is a 20kg round stone slab with a handle on the top for players to pick up and throw on the ice.

Looking at the form of competition of the shot on the barbell is quite simple. However, in fact this subject requires a very high level of precision every time the players calculate the coordinates and directions to coordinate with the hand throwing the dumbbell to the target position. Curling is also an object that is carefully analyzed about the impact of the friction force and the direction of the dumbbell’s rotation, making it more interesting for fans to learn the natural principles of matter. Therefore, throwing weightlifting on ice also needs sophisticated tactics. Not only that, Curling also causes the athletes to lose a lot of energy.